Changes to North York’s Fixer bike lane will alter the city’s ‘historic’ street

Story highlights F. Scott Fitzgerald first saw the streetwork in Chicago in the 1920s

In 1922, Mr. Lloyd George suggested changing the name of Bond Street to Story Street

The recently relocated Fixer bike lane in North York, Toronto, reopened this past Sunday after being closed since February. While the bike lane’s reopening will make life easier for cyclists, residents are expressing concern over the new bike lane’s safety.

One bike lane resident on Facebook wrote, “The transformation is painfully obvious that it is an entirely different street. I am totally opposed to the demolition and reconfiguration of Streetcar Drive…No car has ever hit an object on this street. It is a conservation street.”

Aside from the lane change, another priority on Fixer is revamping bridges. With the city’s push for a more connected “town center,” there will be a major overhaul of Bond Street. Given this, any number of different pedestrian, bike, skateboard and bus amenities will need to be reworked.

The temporary bike lane was technically built as a fix for a problem on Gladstone Street. But that bike lane was temporarily installed for only a few months before it had to be moved, ultimately to accommodate renovation on a few other side streets as well.

After the reopening of the temporary bike lane, Toronto’s Municipal Affairs and Housing Ministry says there will now be a second dedicated bike lane on Gladstone Street. The Ministry previously stated that after Fixer, there would be eight bike lanes in the area.

Here’s how the other problems are being fixed in North York:

Original Story: Crowded aisles, hole and raised concerns plague a dangerous street

Just two months ago, News 6 visited Bond Street in North York and found that high-traffic street to be a nightmare, with almost every travel lane blocked off and dangerous traffic jams affecting much of the area.

On weekends, people stood on the road trying to figure out how to get to their destination. Cars were reduced to two lanes, and vehicles on the street often blocked off pedestrians.

A commuter passing through the area told News 6 in early May that she only gets to work once or twice a week.

“Because there are so many cars in this area, I have to worry about my safety and I’m worried about the safety of other people. This is a ‘ridiculous’ situation to be in,” Amy Sanders, who works in investment banking, told News 6.

Crowded aisles, low visibility, smashed glass and the middle of cars were the typical sights on the busy street, in the midst of construction for a new street.

Crowded alleys made walking down the center of Bond Street impossible for the more than 200 people who live in the neighborhood.

In June, News 6 spoke with Ontario Premier Doug Ford about it:

“Sometimes things can have some unforeseen problems,” Ford said. “One example is the BRT on Gladstone Street. They had some problems that were unforeseen. It has been done properly,” Ford told reporters during a news conference about Ford’s agenda for rural Ontario.

Early Saturday, Wynne said the region’s transportation officials had made “minor fixes” to fix a car-clogged intersection at Gladstone and Sheppard, but they were not enough. Wynne said she also ordered the widening of the bottom lane in order to reduce the amount of traffic flowing at high speeds.

“It’s much too slow to be safe for cyclists and pedestrians,” Wynne said at a news conference.

The subway corridor between Barrie and Hamilton as well as the planned bike and pedestrian path at Yonge Street are currently scheduled to be completed later this year, Wynne said.

In June, Toronto’s Municipal Affairs and Housing Ministry said that the temporary bike lane was technically built as a fix for a problem on Gladstone Street. But that bike lane was temporarily installed for only a few months before it had to be moved, ultimately to accommodate renovation on a few other side streets as well.

The temporary bike lane was technically built as a fix for a problem on Gladstone Street. But that bike lane was temporarily installed for only a few months before it had to be moved, ultimately to accommodate renovation on a few other side streets as well.

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